Journal article

Potent priming by inactivated whole influenza virus particle vaccines is linked to viral RNA uptake into antigen presenting cells

Masashi Shingai, Naoki Nomura, Toshiki Sekiya, Marumi Ohno, Daisuke Fujikura, Chimuka Handabile, Ryosuke Omori, Yuki Ohara, Tomohiro Nishimura, Masafumi Endo, Kazuhiko Kimachi, Ryotarou Mitsumata, Tomio Ikeda, Hiroki Kitayama, Hironori Hatanaka, Tomoyoshi Sobue, Fumihito Muro, Saori Suzuki, Cong Thanh Nguyen, Hirohito Ishigaki Show all

VACCINE | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

Current detergent or ether-disrupted split vaccines (SVs) for influenza do not always induce adequate immune responses, especially in young children. This contrasts with the whole virus particle vaccines (WPVs) originally used against influenza that were immunogenic in both adults and children but were replaced by SV in the 1970s due to concerns with reactogenicity. In this study, we re-evaluated the immunogenicity of WPV and SV, prepared from the same batch of purified influenza virus, in cynomolgus macaques and confirmed that WPV is superior to SV in priming potency. In addition, we compared the ability of WPV and SV to induce innate immune responses, including the maturation of dendritic ..

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Grants

Awarded by Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (JGRID)


Awarded by Japan Program for Infectious Diseases Research and Infrastructure (JIDRI) from Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)


Awarded by Research Program on Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases from Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)


Awarded by Program for Leading Graduate Schools from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)


Awarded by Doctoral Program for Worldleading Innovative & Smart Education (WISE) Program from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT)


Awarded by JSPS KAKENHI


Awarded by WISE Program, MEXT


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Mayumi Sasada, Mamiko Kawahara, and Hideaki Ishida for helping with experiments and all member of all Japan influenza vaccine study group for helpful discussion. We also thank Dr. Watanabe (National Institute of Infectious Disease in Japan) for kindly providing influenza virus strains, A/California/7/2009 (X-179A) (H1N1) pdm09, A/Singapore/GP1908/2015 (IVR-180) (H1N1) , A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (X-263) (H3N2) , B/Phuket/3073/2013 (Yamagata linage) , and B/Texas/2/2013 (Victoria lineage) . The project was supported by the Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (JGRID; JP19fm0108008) , the Japan Program for Infectious Diseases Research and Infrastructure (JIDRI; JP20wm0125008) and Research Program on Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases (21fk0108142) from Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) , the Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GICoRE) program of Hokkaido University, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) program, the Program for Leading Graduate Schools (F01) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and Doctoral Program for Worldleading Innovative & Smart Education (WISE) Program (1801) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) . M Ohno and M Shingai were supported by grants from JSPS KAKENHI (grant numbers 17K15367 and 18K07135, respectively) . C Handabile was supported by WISE Program (1801) , MEXT. K Kedzierska was supported by the NHMRC Leadership Investigator Grant (#1173871) .