Journal article

Long-term exposure to artificial light at night in the wild decreases survival and growth of a coral reef fish

Jules Schligler, Daphne Cortese, Ricardo Beldade, Stephen E Swearer, Suzanne C Mills

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES | ROYAL SOC | Published : 2021

Abstract

Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing anthropogenic pollutant, closely associated with human population density, and now well recognized in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. However, we have a relatively poor understanding of the effects of ALAN in the marine realm. Here, we carried out a field experiment in the coral reef lagoon of Moorea, French Polynesia, to investigate the effects of long-term exposure (18-23 months) to chronic light pollution at night on the survival and growth of wild juvenile orange-fin anemonefish, Amphiprion chrysopterus. Long-term exposure to environmentally relevant underwater illuminance (mean: 4.3 lux), reduced survival (mean: 36%) and growt..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Agence National de la Recherche


Awarded by Haut-Commissariat de la Republique en Polynesie francaise


Funding Acknowledgements

Financial support was provided by the Agence National de la Recherche (ANR-14-CE02-0005-01/Stay or Go) to G.A., S.C.M., and R.B., by the Haut-Commissariat de la Republique en Polynesie francaise (HC/3041/DIE/BPT/) to S.C.M. and Pacific Funds (BLEACH & ALAN) to S.C.M.