Journal article

Seeking an optimal dosing regimen for OZ439/DSM265 combination therapy for treating uncomplicated falciparum malaria

Saber Dini, Sophie G Zaloumis, David J Price, Nathalie Gobeau, Anne Kummel, Mohammed Cherkaoui, Joerg J Moehrle, James S McCarthy, Julie A Simpson

JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMOTHERAPY | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), the first-line treatments for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, has been declining in malaria-endemic countries due to the emergence of malaria parasites resistant to these compounds. Novel alternative therapies are needed urgently to prevent the likely surge in morbidity and mortality due to failing ACTs. OBJECTIVES: This study investigates the efficacy of the combination of two novel drugs, OZ439 and DSM265, using a biologically informed within-host mathematical model. METHODS: A within-host model was developed, which accounts for the differential killing of these compounds against different stages of the parasite'..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Centre for Research Excellence in Malaria Elimination - NHMRC


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by Global Health Innovation and Technology Fund (GHIT)


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Australian Centre for Research Excellence in Malaria Elimination, funded by the NHMRC (1134989). J.A.S. is funded by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Investigator Grant (1196068). J.S.M. is funded by an NHMRC Program Grant (1132975) and Practitioner Fellowship (1041802). The clinical trials (NCT02389348, NCT02573857, ACTRN12613000522718, ACTRN12613000527763 and ACTRN12612000814875) from which the data were derived were supported by the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) and funded by the Wellcome Trust (grant reference number: 095909/Z/11/Z), a grant by the Global Health Innovation and Technology Fund (GHIT) (grant no. G2014-108) and by funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.