Journal article

Biodiversity conservation cannot afford COVID-19 communication bungles

Emily A Gregg, Alexander M Kusmanoff, Georgia E Garrard, Lindall R Kidd, Sarah A Bekessy

TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION | ELSEVIER SCIENCE LONDON | Published : 2021

Abstract

With COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) dominating headlines, highlighting links between the pandemic and biodiversity may increase public awareness of the biodiversity crisis. However, ill-considered messages that frame nature as the problem rather than the solution could inadvertently propagate problematic narratives and undermine motivations and individual self-efficacy to conserve nature.

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct our work. This research was supported by the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Program through the Threatened Species Recovery Hub. E.A.G. is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program Support Scholarship and an RMIT DSC Strategic Investment Funds Scholarship.