Journal article

Development of brain white matter and math computation ability in children born very preterm and full-term

Simonne E Collins, Deanne K Thompson, Claire E Kelly, Joseph YM Yang, Leona Pascoe, Terrie E Inder, Lex W Doyle, Jeanie LY Cheong, Alice C Burnett, Peter J Anderson

DEVELOPMENTAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

Children born very preterm (VPT; <32 weeks' gestation) have alterations in brain white matter and poorer math ability than full-term (FT) peers. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest a link between white matter microstructure and math in VPT and FT children, although longitudinal studies using advanced modelling are lacking. In a prospective longitudinal cohort of VPT and FT children we used Fixel-Based Analysis to investigate associations between maturation of white matter fibre density (FD), fibre-bundle cross-section (FC), and combined fibre density and cross-section (FDC) and math computation ability at 7 (n = 136 VPT; n = 32 FT) and 13 (n = 130 VPT; n = 44 FT) ye..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by Royal Children's Hospital Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship (to SEC) , the Australian National Health Medical Research Council (NHMRC; Centre for Research Excellence 546519, 1060733 and 1153176; Project Grant 237117, 491209 and 1066555; Senior Research Fellowship 1081288 to PJA; Investigator Grant 1176077 to PJA; Career Development Fellowships 1085754 and 1160003 to DKT and 1141354 to JLYC, and; Early Career Fellowship 1012236 to DKT) , the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, the Royal Children's Hospital, the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation (RCH1000 to JYMY) , the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne, and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. The funding organizations/sponsors had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.