Journal article

Impact of quarterly professional-mode flash glucose monitoring in adults with type 2 diabetes in general practice (GP-OSMOTIC): Secondary psychological and self-care outcomes of a pragmatic, open-label, 12-month, randomised controlled trial

Jane Speight, E Holmes-Truscott, Sharmala Thuraisingam, Hanafi Mohamad Husin, Jo-Anne Manski-Nankervis, Katie De La Rue, Louise Ginnivan, Ralph Audehm, Malcolm Clark, Kamlesh Khunti, David O'Neal, John Furler

DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

AIMS: To investigate the impact of quarterly professional-mode flash glucose monitoring on psychological outcomes in adults with type 2 diabetes in primary care. METHODS: The GP-OSMOTIC trial randomised 299 adults with type 2 diabetes in 25 general practices to quarterly use of professional-mode flash glucose monitoring (sensor worn for 14 days; data discussed at clinic visit) or usual care. At baseline and 12 months, participants completed validated measures: general emotional well-being (WHO-5), diabetes-specific quality of life (DIDP), satisfaction with glucose monitoring (GME-Q), self-care activities (SDSCA) and perceived involvement in clinical care (PICS). Linear mixed-effects models e..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

The GP-OSMOTIC trial was funded by a peer-reviewed grant from the National Health and Medical Council (NHMRC) of Australia (APP1104241). It was also supported by Sanofi and Abbott. JS and EH-T are supported by core funding to the Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes provided by the collaboration between Diabetes Victoria and Deakin University. KK is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration East Midlands (ARC EM) and the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC).