Journal article

Centering inclusivity in the design of online conferences-An OHBM-Open Science perspective

Elizabeth Levitis, Cassandra D Gould van Praag, Remi Gau, Stephan Heunis, Elizabeth DuPre, Gregory Kiar, Katherine L Bottenhorn, Tristan Glatard, Aki Nikolaidis, Kirstie Jane Whitaker, Matteo Mancini, Guiomar Niso, Soroosh Afyouni, Eva Alonso-Ortiz, Stefan Appelhoff, Aurina Arnatkeviciute, Selim Melvin Atay, Tibor Auer, Giulia Baracchini, Johanna MM Bayer Show all

GIGASCIENCE | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2021

Abstract

As the global health crisis unfolded, many academic conferences moved online in 2020. This move has been hailed as a positive step towards inclusivity in its attenuation of economic, physical, and legal barriers and effectively enabled many individuals from groups that have traditionally been underrepresented to join and participate. A number of studies have outlined how moving online made it possible to gather a more global community and has increased opportunities for individuals with various constraints, e.g., caregiving responsibilities. Yet, the mere existence of online conferences is no guarantee that everyone can attend and participate meaningfully. In fact, many elements of an online..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by NIH


Awarded by NIMH


Awarded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, London


Awarded by European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union


Awarded by Elsass Foundation


Awarded by Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research


Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health


Awarded by Translational Research Institute through the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the NIH


Awarded by UK Medical Research Council


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by Intramural Research Program of the NIMH


Awarded by Research Foundation Flanders


Awarded by NSF


Funding Acknowledgements

C.G.v.P. received funding from the Medical Research Council UK and the NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre. A.R.L. and K.L.B. were supported by NIH R25-DA051675, NIH U01-DA041156, NSF 1631325, and NIH R01-DA041353. A.N. is supported by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation NARSAD grant and NIMH grant 5R21MH118556-02. E.A-O. is supported by TransMedTech Institute fellowship. T.A. is supported by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, London ([BB/S008314/1] (PI: Ines Violante). S.B. is supported by the National Imaging Facility, a National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) capability, at the Centre for Advanced Imaging, the University of Queensland. M.F. received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (ERC Advanced Grant agreement No. 694,665: CoBCoMComputational Brain Connectivity Mapping. PI: Rachid Deriche). M.G. is supported by the Elsass Foundation (18-3-0147). E.A.G.V. is supported by the Laboratorio Nacional de Imagenolog ' ia por Resonancia Magn ' etica (LANIREM). T.G. is supported by a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Global Fellowship under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. O.G. was supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (Grant 016.Vidi.188.029) awarded to Dr. Andrea E. Martin. V.I. is supported by the MIUR project "Dipartimenti di eccellenza". D.B.K. was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health under grant RF1 MH120021. L. L.-P. was supported in part by the Translational Research Institute grant TL1 TR003109 through the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the NIH. A.L. is supported by the UK Medical Research Council (MR/N013700) and King's College London member of the MRC Doctoral Training Partnership in Biomedical Sciences. A.L. is supported by a PhD Studentship awarded from the Wellcome Trust (109062/Z/15/Z). M.M. is funded by the Wellcome Trust through a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship (213722/Z/18/Z). S.M.L. is supported by a Melbourne Research Scholarship. G.N. is supported by the AXA Research Fund. NeuroHackademy is supported through R25 MH112480 from the National Institute of Mental Health (PI: Ariel Rokem). T.C. is supported by the National Imaging Facility, a National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) capability, at Syd-ney Imaging, The University of Sydney. Thisworkwas supported in part by the Intramural Research Program of the NIMH: E.L. by ZIAMH002949, D.H. by ZIAMH002783, D.M. by ZICMH002960, and M.N. by ZIAMH002909. S.V.D.B. was supported by the Research Foundation Flanders, grant No. G036716N. R.B.-N. is an Awardee of the Weizmann Institute of Science -Israel National Postdoctoral Award Program for Advancing Women in Science.