Journal article

Role of saliva use during masturbation in the transmission of Chlamydia trachomatis in men who have sex with men

Xianglong Xu, Eric PF Chow, David Regan, Jason J Ong, Richard T Gray, Pingyu Zhou, Christopher K Fairley, Lei Zhang

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2021

Abstract

Masturbation is a common sexual practice in men, and saliva is often used as a lubricant during masturbation by men who have sex with men. However, the role of saliva use during masturbation in the transmission of chlamydia is still unclear. We developed population-level, susceptible-infected-susceptible compartmental models to explore the role of saliva use during masturbation on the transmission of chlamydia at multiple anatomical sites. In this study, we simulated both solo masturbation and mutual masturbation. Our baseline model did not include masturbation but included transmission routes (anal sex, oral-penile sex, rimming, kissing and sequential sexual practices) we have previously va..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Leadership Investigator Grant


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council early career fellowship


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Outstanding Young Scholars Support Program


Awarded by Xi'an Jiaotong University Basic Research and Profession Grant


Awarded by Epidemiology modeling and risk assessment


Awarded by Xi'an Jiaotong University Young Scholar Support Grant


Funding Acknowledgements

EPFC is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant (GNT1172873). CKF is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Leadership Investigator Grant (GNT1172900). JJO is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council early career fellowship (APP1104781). LZ is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant number: 81950410639); Outstanding Young Scholars Support Program (Grant number: 3111500001); Xi'an Jiaotong University Basic Research and Profession Grant (Grant number: xtr022019003, xzy032020032); Epidemiology modeling and risk assessment (Grant number: 20200344) and Xi'an Jiaotong University Young Scholar Support Grant (Grant number: YX6J004).