Journal article

What is "usual care" in the rehabilitation of upper limb sensory loss after stroke? Results from a national audit and knowledge translation study

Liana S Cahill, Natasha A Lannin, Tara Purvis, Dominique A Cadilhac, Yvonne Mak-Yuen, Denise A O'Connor, Leeanne M Carey

DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION | TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

PURPOSE: To characterise the assessments and treatments that comprise "usual care" for stroke patients with somatosensory loss, and whether usual care has changed over time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Comparison of cross-sectional, observational data from (1) Stroke Foundation National Audit of Acute (2007-2019) and Rehabilitation (2010-2018) Stroke Services and (2) the SENSe Implement multi-site knowledge translation study with occupational therapists and physiotherapists (n = 115). Descriptive statistics, random effects logistic regression, and content analysis were used. RESULTS: Acute hospitals (n = 172) contributed 24 996 cases across audits from 2007 to 2019 (median patient age 76 years, 5..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by Future Leader Fellowship from the National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) - Heart Foundation


Awarded by NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia partnership grants: A network of sites and "up-skilled" therapists to deliver best practice stroke rehabilitation of the upper limb (GNT 1134495) and Ideas grant: Staying connected: personalising stroke recovery and rehabilitation through new technologies for people with stroke living at home (GNT143480). LSC and YMY are supported by La Trobe University Post-Graduate Scholarships. NAL is supported by a Future Leader Fellowship (102055) from the National Heart Foundation of Australia. DC is supported by a research fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) (1063761 co-funded by the Heart Foundation; 1154273). DAO is supported by an NHMRC Translating Research into Practice Fellowship (GNT 1168749).