Journal article

Squeeze-Film Effect on Atomically Thin Resonators in the High-Pressure Limit

Robin J Dolleman, Debadi Chakraborty, Daniel R Ladiges, Herre SJ van der Zant, John E Sader, Peter G Steeneken

NANO LETTERS | AMER CHEMICAL SOC | Published : 2021

Abstract

The resonance frequency of membranes depends on the gas pressure due to the squeeze-film effect, induced by the compression of a thin gas film that is trapped underneath the resonator by the high-frequency motion. This effect is particularly large in low-mass graphene membranes, which makes them promising candidates for pressure-sensing applications. Here, we study the squeeze-film effect in single-layer graphene resonators and find that their resonance frequency is lower than expected from models assuming ideal compression. To understand this deviation, we perform Boltzmann and continuum finite-element simulations and propose an improved model that includes the effects of gas leakage and ca..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)


Awarded by European Union


Awarded by Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science


Awarded by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Applied Mathematics Program


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank Applied Nanolayers B.V. for the supply and transfer of the single-layer graphene used in this study. This work is part of the research programme Integrated Graphene Pressure Sensors (IGPS) with project number 13307 which is financed by The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The research leading to these results also received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 785219 and 881603 Graphene Flagship. This work hasreceived funding from the EMPIR programme cofinanced by the Participating States and from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. R.J.D. also acknowledges funding from the Mobility Grant within the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 785219 Graphene Flagship, and support from the University of Melbourne and the Graduate Union of the University of Melbourne, Inc. D.C., D.R.L., and J.E.S. gratefully acknowledge support from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science (CE170100026) and the Australian Research Council Grants Scheme. D.R.L. also acknowledges funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Applied Mathematics Program under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.