Journal article

Risky youth to risky adults: Sustained increased risk of crash in the DRIVE study 13 years on

Holger Moller, Rebecca Ivers, Patricia Cullen, Kris Rogers, Soufiane Boufous, George Patton, Teresa Senserrick

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE | ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE | Published : 2021

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate if drivers who exhibit risky driving behaviours during youth (aged 17-24 years) have an increased risk of car crash up to 13 years later. We used data from the DRIVE study, a 2003/04 survey of 20,806 young novice drivers in New South Wales, Australia. The data were linked with police crash, hospital and deaths data up to 2016. We analysed differences in crash associated with 13 items of risky driving behaviours using negative binominal regression models adjusted for driver demographics, driving exposure and known crash risk factors. The items were summarised in one index and grouped into quintiles for the analysis. After adjusting for confoundin..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Centre of Research Excellence: Driving Global Investment in Adolescent Health - NHMRC


Awarded by Wellbeing Health & Youth Centre of Research Excellence in Adolescent Health - NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

Relinkage of the DRIVE study was funded by National Roads and Motorists'Association (NRMA) - Australian Capital Territory Road Safety Trust (Grant ID: NA) .The original DRIVE Study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Roads and Traffic Authority of New South Wales, National Roads and Motorists' Association (NRMA) Motoring and Services, NRMA-Australian Capital Territory Road Safety Trust, New South Wales Health, and the Motor Accidents Authority of New South Wales.Rebecca Ivers is funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Senior Research Fellowship (Grant ID: APP1136430) and Patricia Cullen by a NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (Grant ID: APP1158223) . This research is supported by the Centre of Research Excellence: Driving Global Investment in Adolescent Health funded by the NHMRC (Grant ID: APP1171981) , and also by the Wellbeing Health & Youth Centre of Research Excellence in Adolescent Health funded by the NHMRC (Grant ID: APP1134894) .