Journal article

Altered resting-state functional connectome in major depressive disorder: a mega-analysis from the PsyMRI consortium

Nooshin Javaheripour, Meng Li, Tara Chand, Axel Krug, Tilo Kircher, Udo Dannlowski, Igor Nenadic, J Paul Hamilton, Matthew D Sacchet, Ian H Gotlib, Henrik Walter, Thomas Frodl, Simone Grimm, Ben J Harrison, Christian Robert Wolf, Sebastian Olbrich, Guido van Wingen, Lukas Pezawas, Gordon Parker, Matthew P Hyett Show all

TRANSLATIONAL PSYCHIATRY | SPRINGERNATURE | Published : 2021

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with abnormal neural circuitry. It can be measured by assessing functional connectivity (FC) at resting-state functional MRI, that may help identifying neural markers of MDD and provide further efficient diagnosis and monitor treatment outcomes. The main aim of the present study is to investigate, in an unbiased way, functional alterations in patients with MDD using a large multi-center dataset from the PsyMRI consortium including 1546 participants from 19 centers ( www.psymri.com ). After applying strict exclusion criteria, the final sample consisted of 606 MDD patients (age: 35.8 ± 11.9 y.o.; females: 60.7%) and 476 healthy participants (age: 3..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by German Research Foundation (DFG)


Awarded by German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG)


Awarded by Austrian Science Fund (FWF)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by German Research Foundation


Awarded by European Commission


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowships


Awarded by Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the medical faculty of Munster


Funding Acknowledgements

NJ thanks Stefan Schmidt for editing manuscript. AK was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant KR 3822/7-1, KR 3822/7-2 to AK). MW was supported by the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG, SFB779-A06 given to MW). TK was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant FOR2107 KI588/14-1 and FOR2107 KI588/14-2 to TK, Marburg). IN was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant FOR2107 NE2254/2-1 and FOR2107 NE2254/3-1 to IN, Marburg). UD was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant FOR2107 DA1151/5-1 and DA1151/5-2 to UD). LP was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF, grant nr. KLI 597-B27, KLI-148-B00, F3514-B11). TF received grants from Health Research Board (HRB) Ireland and Science Foundation Ireland (SFI). GP was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council (GNT1176689). MPH was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Program Grants 510135 and 1037196. SG was supported by German Research Foundation (GR 4510/2-1); European Commission (grant number H2020-634541). BJH & CGD were supported by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Project Grants 1064643 (principal investigator, BJH) and 1024570 (principal investigator, CGD). CGD and BJH were also supported by NHMRC Career Development Fellowships (1061757 and 1124472, respectively). TH was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG grants HA7070/2-2, HA7070/3, HA7070/4 to TH) and the Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the medical faculty of Munster (grants Dan3/012/17 to UD and MzH 3/020/20 to TH). SG was supported by German Research Foundation (GR 4510/2-1); European Commission (grant number H2020-634541). LB has received travel grants and consultant/speaker honoraria from AOP Orphan, Medizin Medien Austria, Vertretungsnetz, Schwabe Austria, Janssen and Angelini.