Journal article

A cluster-randomised, controlled trial of the impact of Cogmed Working Memory Training on both academic performance and regulation of social, emotional and behavioural challenges

Caitlin Hitchcock, Martin S Westwell

JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY | WILEY | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We explored whether school-based Cogmed Working Memory Training (CWMT) may optimise both academic and psychological outcomes at school. Training of executive control skills may form a novel approach to enhancing processes that predict academic achievement, such as task-related attention, and thereby academic performance, but also has the potential to improve the regulation of emotion, social problems and behavioural difficulties. METHODS: Primary school children (Mean age = 12 years, N = 148) were cluster-randomised to complete active CWMT, a nonadaptive/placebo version of CWMT, or no training. RESULTS: No evidence was found for training effects on task-related attention when per..

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Grants

Awarded by Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for this research was provided by the Australian Research Council, Science of Learning Research Centre. The authors have declared that they have no competing or potential conflicts of interest. The authors would like to thank the participating students, parents, teachers and schools for their commitment and dedication to the project. We also thank Deb Lasscock, Shannon De Silva and Calvin Richardson for their assistance with data collection.