Journal article

Mice lacking angiotensin-converting enzyme have increased energy expenditure, with reduced fat mass and improved glucose clearance

Anura P Jayasooriya, Michael L Mathai, Lesley L Walker, Denovan P Begg, Derek A Denton, David Cameron-Smith, Gary F Egan, Michael J McKinley, Paula D Rodger, Andrew J Sinclair, John D Wark, Harrison S Weisinger, Mark Jois, Richard S Weisinger

PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA | NATL ACAD SCIENCES | Published : 2008

Abstract

In addition to its role in the storage of fat, adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ, and it contains a functional renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a key role in the RAS by converting angiotensin I to the bioactive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II). In the present study, the effect of targeting the RAS in body energy homeostasis and glucose tolerance was determined in homozygous mice in which the gene for ACE had been deleted (ACE(-/-)) and compared with wild-type littermates. Compared with wild-type littermates, ACE(-/-) mice had lower body weight and a lower proportion of body fat, especially in the abdomen. ACE(-/-) mice had greater fed-state tot..

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