Journal article

Anatomic Abnormalities of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Before Psychosis Onset: An MRI Study of Ultra-High-Risk Individuals

Alex Fornito, Alison R Yung, Stephen J Wood, Lisa J Phillips, Barnaby Nelson, Sue Cotton, Dennis Velakoulis, Patrick D McGorry, Christos Pantelis, Murat Yuecel

BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2008

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Abnormalities of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders, but whether such changes are apparent before psychosis onset remains unclear. In this study, we characterized prepsychotic ACC abnormalities in a sample of individuals at ultra-high-risk (UHR) for psychosis. METHODS: Participants underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging and were followed-up over 12-24 months to ascertain diagnostic outcomes. Baseline ACC morphometry was then compared between UHR individuals who developed psychosis (UHR-P; n = 35), those who did not (UHR-NP; n = 35), and healthy control subjects (n = 33). RESULTS: Relative to control s..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by CJ Martin Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Clinical Career Development Award


Funding Acknowledgements

Neuroimaging analysis was facilitated by the Neuropsyciatry Imaging Laboratory managed by Ms. Bridget Soulsby at the Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre and supported by Neurosciences Victoria. The research was supported by the Melbourne Neuropsychialry Centre (Sunshine Hospital), Department of Psychiatry, the University of Melbourne, the National Health and Medical Research Council (ID 236175; 350241), and the Ian Potter Foundation. AF was supported by a JN Peters Fellowship and a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) CJ Martin Fellowship (ID: 454797). SJW was supported by a NHMRC Clinical Career Development Award and a National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression Young Investigator Award. MY was supported by a NHMRC Clinical Career Development Award (ID: 509345).