Journal article

Inbreeding and testicular abnormalities in a bottlenecked population of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)

Romane Cristescu, Valma Cahill, William B Sherwin, Kathrine Handasyde, Kris Carlyon, Desley Whisson, Catherine A Herbert, Britt Louise J Carlsson, Alan N Wilton, Des W Cooper

WILDLIFE RESEARCH | CSIRO PUBLISHING | Published : 2009

Abstract

Habitat destruction and fragmentation, interactions with introduced species or the relocation of animals to form new populations for conservation purposes may result in a multiplication of population bottlenecks. Examples are the translocations of koalas to French Island and its derivative Kangaroo Island population, with both populations established as insurance policies against koala extinction. In terms of population size, these conservation programs were success stories. However, the genetic story could be different. We conducted a genetic investigation of French and Kangaroo Island koalas by using 15 microsatellite markers, 11 of which are described here for the first time. The results ..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by ARC linkage grant


Awarded by University of Melbourne Science Animal Experimentation Ethics Committee Project


Awarded by Department for Environment and Heritage, South Australia, Wildlife Ethics Committee Approval


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was funded by ARC linkage grant (LPO560344). We thank the Department for Environment and Heritage ( DEH), South Australia, for providing access to unpublished data from the Koala Management Program. We also thank the Rangers from French Island National Park ( Parks Victoria) and the members of the Koala Management Program ( DEH) for their support and assistance in the field and Bill Amos for providing the program to estimate IR. We also thank Andrea Taylor and three anonymous reviewers for their most helpful comments. All the work and particularly manipulations of koalas were approved by relevant ethic committees and accredited with relevant licences and permits. Authorisations were obtained under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1985 ( SA), Licence # 46, dated 14 October 1997, the Macquarie University ACEC Permit # 97041, the University of Melbourne Science Animal Experimentation Ethics Committee Project # 03147, the Victorian Department of Sustainability & Environment Wildlife Research Permit # 10003860, the Department for Environment and Heritage, South Australia, Wildlife Ethics Committee Approval # 45/2005, Scientific Research Permit # E25038-2 and Licence # 169.