Journal article

A SHELL OF ITS FORMER SELF: CAN OSTREA LURIDA CARPENTER 1864 LARVAL SHELLS REVEAL INFORMATION ABOUT A RECRUIT's BIRTH LOCATION?

Danielle C Zacher, Steven G Morgan, Stephen E Swearer, Robert R Warner

Journal of Shellfish Research | NATL SHELLFISHERIES ASSOC | Published : 2009

Abstract

Despite the interest in restoring remnant populations of the Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida Carpenter 1864,† little is known about connectivity among populations. Identifying the sources of settling larvae could broaden our understanding of the degree to which particular populations are reliant on their neighbors for their persistence. Calcified structures such as the otoliths of fish and statoliths of invertebrates are increasingly being exploited as useful "natural tags" that help track individual movements and, when applicable to larvae, could help to pinpoint important source populations. In controlled laboratory culturing experiments, we explored the prospects for using the chemistry of ..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by NSF


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank K. Menard and D. Kimbro for advice concerning Olympia oyster husbandry, T. Westman for helping 31 Out. with culturing, and M. Sheehy and G. Paradis for help with the laboratory work. The authors also thank three anonymous reviewers who provided excellent feedback that greatly improved the quality of the manuscript. D. Zacherl would especially like to thank D. and C. A. Zimmer for extremely generous support, advice and guidance. The following provided funding: NSF-OCE 0351860, CEQI (Coastal Environmental Quality Initiative), and the partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO): A Long-Term Ecological Consortium (funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation).