Journal article

Permanent and transient effects of locally delivered n-acetyl cysteine in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation

Hayden Eastwood, Darren Pinder, David James, Andrew Chang, Stuart Galloway, Rachael Richardson, Stephen O'Leary

HEARING RESEARCH | ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV | Published : 2010

Abstract

Protection of residual hearing after cochlear implant surgery can improve the speech and music perception of cochlear implant recipients, particularly in the presence of background noise. Surgical trauma and chronic inflammation are thought to be responsible for a significant proportion of residual hearing loss after surgery. Local delivery of the anti-oxidant precursor n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) to the cochlea via round window 30min prior to surgery, increased the level of residual hearing at 24-32kHz 4weeks post surgery compared to controls. The hearing protection was found in the basal turn near the site of implantation. Coincidentally, the basal turn was also the location that sustained the..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by NIDCD


Awarded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS


Funding Acknowledgements

Project grants from the Garnett Passe and Rodney Williams Memorial Foundation and the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia.Helen Feng for manufacturing electrode arrays.Maria Clark and Prudence Nielsen for preparing histological materials.Dr. James Fallon for providing the ABR analysis program (NIDCD Contract HHS-N-263-2007-00053-C; PI: RK Shepherd).Dr. Alec Salt, Washington University Cochlear Fluids Simulator: Version 1.6 available from http://oto.wustl.edu/cochlea/modet.htm (This program was developed and is made available by Grant funding (DC 01368) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health.).Dimitra Stathopoulos for editing the manuscript.