Journal article

Self-harm and risk of motor vehicle crashes among young drivers: findings from the DRIVE Study

Alexandra LC Martiniuk, Rebecca Q Ivers, Nick Glozier, George C Patton, Lawrence T Lam, Soufiane Boufous, Teresa Senserrick, Ann Williamson, Mark Stevenson, Robyn Norton

CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION JOURNAL | CMA-CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOC | Published : 2009

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Some motor vehicle crashes, particularly single-vehicle crashes, may result from intentional self-harm. We conducted a prospective cohort study to assess the risk that intentional self-harm poses for motor vehicle crashes among young drivers. METHODS: We prospectively linked survey data from newly licensed drivers aged 17-24 years to data on licensing attempts and police-reported motor vehicle crashes during the follow-up period. We investigated the role of recent engagement in self-harm on the risk of a crash. We took into account potential confounders, including number of hours of driving per week, psychological symptoms and substance abuse. RESULTS: We included 18 871 drivers ..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

The DRIVE Study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the Roads and Traffic Authority of New South Wales, the National Roads and Motorists' Association (NRMA) Motoring and Services, the NRMA Road Safety Trust, New South Wales Health and the Motor Accidents Authority of New South Wales. Alexandra Martiniuk, Rebecca Ivers, Soufiane Boufous, Teresa Senserrick and Mark Stevenson receive salary funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. Alexandra Martiniuk was also supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research fellowship. No funding agency had any role in the design, analysis or interpretation of the data. Data on motor vehicle crashes were collected by the Roads and Traffic Authority of New South Wales.