Journal article

Update on Legionnaires' disease: pathogenesis, epidemiology, detection and control

Hubert Hilbi, Sophie Jarraud, Elizabeth Hartland, Carmen Buchrieser

MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2010

Abstract

Legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease is an emerging and often-fatal form of pneumonia that is most severe in elderly and immunocompromised people, an ever-increasing risk group for infection. In recent years, the genomics of Legionella spp. has significantly increased our knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease by providing new insights into the evolution and genetic and physiological basis of Legionella-host interactions. The seventh international conference on Legionella, Legionella 2009, illustrated many recent conceptual advances in epidemiology, pathogenesis and ecology. Experts in different fields presented new findings on basic mechanisms of pathogen-host interactions and bact..

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Grants

Awarded by Swiss National Science Foundation


Awarded by NIH


Awarded by Network of Excellence 'Europathogenomics'


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank all participants who contributed to this wonderful meeting. We regret that space limitations do not allow us to report on every topic covered, in particular on the many excellent posters. This meeting was organized by the Institut Pasteur and was supported by EMBO, FEMS, the Institut de Veille Sanitaire, the Dim Maladie Infectieuse and the Centre National de Reference des Legionella, France. We are grateful for the generous support of many sponsors. We would like to thank our colleagues for allowing us to cite unpublished work. The funding for research in the authors' laboratories was provided by the Swiss National Science Foundation (31003A_125369) and the University of Zurich (to HH), the Institut Pasteur, the Centre National de la Recherche (CNRS), NIH Grant 2 R01 AI44212 and the Network of Excellence 'Europathogenomics' LSHB-CT-2005-512061, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), University of Lyon, as well as grants to ELH from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and Australian Research Council (ARC).