Journal article

Recruitment and rate-coding strategies of the human genioglossus muscle

Julian P Saboisky, Amy S Jordan, Danny J Eckert, David P White, John A Trinder, Christian L Nicholas, Shiva Gautam, Atul Malhotra

JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY | AMER PHYSIOLOGICAL SOC | Published : 2010

Abstract

Single motor unit (SMU) analysis provides a means to examine the motor control of a muscle. SMUs in the genioglossus show considerable complexity, with several different firing patterns. Two of the primary stimuli that contribute to genioglossal activation are carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and negative pressure, which act through chemoreceptor and mechanoreceptor activation, respectively. We sought to determine how these stimuli affect the behavior of genioglossus SMUs. We quantified genioglossus SMU discharge activity during periods of quiet breathing, elevated CO(2) (facilitation), and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) administration (inhibition). CPAP was applied in 2-cmH(2)O increments..

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Grants

Awarded by American Heart Association


Awarded by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the American Heart Association Grant 0840159N and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Grants R01 HL085188, R01 HL090897, K24 HL093218, and P01 HL095491. J. P. Saboisky is supported by the American Heart Association Founders Affiliate Postdoctoral Fellowship Award (0826061D). D. J. Eckert is supported by Overseas Biomedical (CJ Martin) Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (510392).D. P. White is the Chief Medical Officer for Philips Respironics. D. J. Eckert consults for Apnex Medical. A. Malhotra has received consulting and/or research income from Philips, Apnex Medical, Medtronic, Ethicon, Pfizer, Merck, SGS, SHC, Itamar, Cephalon, and Sepracor. A. S. Jordan consults for Apnex Medical. A number of the authors have industry affiliations related to the treatment of sleep apnea. This study examining physiological mechanisms was funded via peer review grant agencies.