Journal article

Mechanism Underlying Accelerated Arterial Oxygen Desaturation during Recurrent Apnea

Scott A Sands, Bradley A Edwards, Vanessa J Kelly, Elizabeth M Skuza, Malcolm R Davidson, Malcolm H Wilkinson, Philip J Berger

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE | AMER THORACIC SOC | Published : 2010

Abstract

RATIONALE: Brief recurrent apneas in preterm infants and adults can precipitate rapid and severe arterial O(2) desaturation for reasons that remain unclear. OBJECTIVES: We tested a mathematically derived hypothesis that when breathing terminates apnea, mixed-venous hypoxemia continues into the subsequent apnea; as a result, there is a surge in pulmonary O(2) uptake that rapidly depletes the finite alveolar O(2) store, thereby accelerating arterial O(2) desaturation. METHODS: Recurrent apneas were simulated in an experimental lamb model. Pulmonary O(2) uptake was calculated from continuously measured arterial and mixed-venous O(2) saturation and cardiac output. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: ..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

Supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Grant 606686, and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program.S.A.S. received an Australian Postgraduate Award of $50,001-

00,000. B.A.E. received grant support from TSANZ, Allen and Hanbury of 850,001-
00,000. V.J.K. received grant support from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the Cooperative Research Council for Asthma and Airways, and the Hill Asthma Foundation of New South Wales (
0,001-$50,000). E.M.S. does not have a financial relationship with a commercial entity that has an interest in the subject of this manuscript. M.R.D. does not have a financial relationship with a commercial entity that has an interest in the subject of this manuscript. M.H.W. does not have a financial relationship with a commercial entity that has an interest in the subject of this manuscript. P.J.B. received more than
00,001 in grant support from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.