Journal article

Quantifying water savings from willow removal in Australian streams

Tanya Doody, Richard Benyon

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT | ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2011

Abstract

Willows (Salix Spp.), while not endemic to Australia, form dense stands in many stream locations. Australia has been experiencing a long-term drought and potential water extraction by willows is considered a significant problem, although little global scientific evidence exists to support such concerns. The extent of willow occupation in Australian streams has been deemed large enough to warrant investigation of their evapotranspiration rates and quantification of potential water savings from willow removal. Willows situated in-stream (permanent water) and on stream banks (semi-permanent water) were monitored over three summers from August 2005 to May 2008 employing heat pulse velocity sap f..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

The reported research was funded by Water for Rivers (WfR) and the CSIRO Water for a Healthy Country Flagship Program (WFHC). The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of Phil Deamer (Water for Rivers) throughout the project lifespan and the assistance of Michele Michael, Colleen Bernie, John Smith, Leroy Stewart, Vijay Koul, Tivi Theiveyanathan and Mark Tunningley with field data collection. They also acknowledge Jeremy and David Barlow for providing access to the field site at Jerilderie and Jeremy for his considerable in-kind assistance and the assistance of Bruce Crittendon. State Water New South Wales provided in-kind support for the Yanco Weir research. Thanks also to Dr Glen Walker, Dr Jenny Carter and Dr Judy Eastham for their valuable comments.