Journal article

Super-Resolution Dissection of Coordinated Events during Malaria Parasite Invasion of the Human Erythrocyte

David T Riglar, Dave Richard, Danny W Wilson, Michelle J Boyle, Chaitali Dekiwadia, Lynne Turnbull, Fiona Angrisano, Danushka S Marapana, Kelly L Rogers, Cynthia B Whitchurch, James G Beeson, Alan F Cowman, Stuart A Ralph, Jake Baum

CELL HOST & MICROBE | CELL PRESS | Published : 2011

Abstract

Erythrocyte invasion by the merozoite is an obligatory stage in Plasmodium parasite infection and essential to malaria disease progression. Attempts to study this process have been hindered by the poor invasion synchrony of merozoites from the only in vitro culture-adapted human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Using fluorescence, three-dimensional structured illumination, and immunoelectron microscopy of filtered merozoites, we analyze cellular and molecular events underlying each discrete step of invasion. Monitoring the dynamics of these events revealed that commitment to the process is mediated through merozoite attachment to the erythrocyte, triggering all subsequent invasion ev..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Funding Acknowledgements

We wish to thank Liz Zuccala for experimental help, Freya Fowkes for advice with statistical analysis, Buzz Baum, Waihong Tham, and Justin Boddey for critical reading of the manuscript, and David Conway, Kevin Tetteh, and Robin Anders for antibodies against MSP1 block 2 and RESA. Human erythrocytes were kindly provided by the Red Cross Blood Bank (Melbourne). This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (Project Grant 637340 J.B. and S.A.R.). D.T.R. is supported through a Pratt Foundation postgraduate scholarship from the University of Melbourne; D.R. is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research postdoctoral fellowship; M.J.B. is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award and Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Top-Up Scholarship through the University of Melbourne; L.T. is supported by a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellowship from the University of Technology Sydney; C.B.W. is supported by a Senior Research Fellowship from the NHMRC; S.A.R. and J.G.B. are supported by Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowships (FT0990350 and FT0992317 respectively); A.F.C. is a Howard Hughes International Scholar and an Australia Fellow of the NHMRC; and J.B. is supported through an NHMRC Career Development Award I (516763) and ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100112).