Journal article

Neuroimaging and Treatment Evidence for Clinical Staging in Psychotic Disorders: From the At-Risk Mental State to Chronic Schizophrenia

Stephen J Wood, Alison R Yung, Patrick D McGorry, Christos Pantelis

BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2011

Abstract

A new approach to understanding severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia is to adopt a clinical staging model. Such a model defines the extent of the illness such that earlier and milder phenomena are distinguished from later, more impairing features. Specifically, a clinical staging model makes three key predictions. First, pathologic measures should be more abnormal in more severe stages. Second, patients who progress between the stages should show change in these same pathologic measures. Finally, treatment should be more effective in the earlier stages, as well as more benign. In this article, we review the evidence for these three predictions from studies of psychotic disorders, wi..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

The research described here has been supported by two National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Program Grants (ID numbers 350241 and 566529). The NHMRC had no role in the preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. Professor Wood was supported by a Clinical Career Development Award (ID 628711) from the NHMRC. Professors Yung and Pantelis are the recipients of NHMRC Senior and Senior Principal Research Fellowships, respectively. Professor Wood has no biomedical financial interests or potential conflicts of interest.Professor Yung has received honoraria and travel grants from Eli Lilly, Bristol Myer Squibb, AstraZeneca, and Janssen-Cilag. Professor Pantelis has received research funding from Janssen-Cilag, Eli-Lilly, Hospira (Mayne), and AstraZeneca and honoraria and travel grants from Janssen-Cilag, Eli-Lilly, Hospira (Mayne), AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Schering Plough, and Lundbeck. Professor McGorry currently receives research support from a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Program Grant (number 566529) and the Colonial foundation. He has also received unrestricted research funding from Astra Zeneca, Eli Lilly, Janssen-Cliag, Pfizer, and Novartis, as well as honoraria for educational and consultancy roles with Astra Zeneca, Eli Lilly, Janssen-Cliag, Pfizer, and Bristol Myer Squibb.