Journal article

Targeted reduction of advanced glycation improves renal function in obesity

Brooke E Harcourt, Karly C Sourris, Melinda T Coughlan, Karen Z Walker, Sonia L Dougherty, Sofianos Andrikopoulos, Amy L Morley, Vicki Thallas-Bonke, Vibhasha Chand, Sally A Penfold, Maximilian PJ de Courten, Merlin C Thomas, Bronwyn A Kingwell, Angelika Bierhaus, Mark E Cooper, Barbora de Courten, Josephine M Forbes

Kidney International | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2011

Abstract

Obesity is highly prevalent in Western populations and is considered a risk factor for the development of renal impairment. Interventions that reduce the tissue burden of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have shown promise in stemming the progression of chronic disease. Here we tested if treatments that lower tissue AGE burden in patients and mice would improve obesity-related renal dysfunction. Overweight and obese individuals (body mass index (BMI) 26-39 kg/m(2)) were recruited to a randomized, crossover clinical trial involving 2 weeks each on a low- and a high-AGE-containing diet. Renal function and an inflammatory profile (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage ..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

BEH has received a PhD scholarship co-jointly supported by Monash University and the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute. MCT is a NHMRC Senior Research Fellow. JMF and MCT are supported by the KHA Bootle Bequest. JMF and BdC are NHMRC Career Development Awardees. BAK is an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow and MEC is an NHMRC Australia Fellow and JDRF Scholar. All the authors declared no competing interests.BEH and KCS contributed equally as authors of this manuscript. We thank Rachael Stoney, Maryann Arnstein, Anna Gasser, Adeline L. Tan, Felicia Y.T. Yap, Jasmine Lyons, Georgia Soldatos, David Bertovic, and Kylie Gilbert for their technical assistance. This study was completed with support from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC).