Journal article

Who should receive recruitment and retention incentives? Improved targeting of rural doctors using medical workforce data

John S Humphreys, Matthew R McGrail, Catherine M Joyce, Anthony Scott, Guyonne Kalb

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH | WILEY | Published : 2012

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to define an improved classification for allocating incentives to support the recruitment and retention of doctors in rural Australia. DESIGN AND SETTING: Geo-coded data (n = 3636 general practitioners (GPs)) from the national Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life study were used to examine statistical variation in four professional indicators (total hours worked, public hospital work, on call after-hours and difficulty taking time off) and two non-professional indicators (partner employment and schooling opportunities) which are all known to be related to difficulties with recruitment and retention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main ou..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Health Services


Funding Acknowledgements

This work, part of the MABEL study, was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Health Services Research Grant (454799) and by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. The views in this paper are ours alone. Thanks to the other members of the MABEL team for their support and input, and a special thank-you to the doctors who gave their valuable time to participate in MABEL.The research reported in this paper is a project of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute, which is supported by a grant from the Commonwealth of Australia as represented by the Department of Health and Ageing. The information and opinions contained in it do not necessarily reflect the views or policy of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute of the Commonwealth of Australia (or the Department of Health and Ageing).