Journal article

Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

Catherine Emmanuel, Natalie Gava, Catherine Kennedy, Rosemary L Balleine, Raghwa Sharma, Gerard Wain, Alison Brand, Russell Hogg, Dariush Etemadmoghadam, Joshy George, Michael J Birrer, Christine L Clarke, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, David DL Bowtell, Paul R Harnett, Anna deFazio

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2011

Abstract

Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion ..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grant 389867 (nhmrc.gov.au) and by a Marsha Rivkin Centre for Ovarian Cancer Pilot Award (marsharivkin.org). RLB is a Cancer Institute NSW Fellow. The Australian Ovarian Cancer Study is supported by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command under DAMD17-01-1-0729, The Cancer Council Victoria, Queensland Cancer Fund, The Cancer Council New South Wales, The Cancer Council South Australia, The Cancer Foundation of Western Australia, The Cancer Council Tasmania and the NHMRC. The Australasian Biospecimens Network - Oncology is funded by the NHMRC. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.