Journal article

Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) perception in ultra-high risk for psychosis participants who develop schizophrenia: Testing the evidence for an endophenotypic marker

Warrick J Brewer, Ashleigh Lin, Paul J Moberg, Gregory Smutzer, Barnaby Nelson, Alison R Yung, Christos Pantelis, Patrick D McGorry, Bruce I Turetsky, Stephen J Wood

PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2012

Abstract

Reports suggesting that schizophrenia participants are more likely to be phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) non-tasters when compared to controls have recently been controversial. If supported, a genetic-based phenotypic variation in PTC taster status is implicated, suggesting a greater illness risk for those participants with recessive alleles for the TAS2R38 receptor. Should PTC insensitivity be a schizophrenia endophenotype, then it would be expected in follow-up of ultra high-risk for psychosis participants who later develop schizophrenia (UHR-S). UHR-S was hypothesised to show reduced PTC sensitivity compared to those who were previously at risk, but did not transition (UHR-NP). PTC perception w..

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Grants

Awarded by NHMRC Australia


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Program Grants from the NHMRC Australia (566529 and 350241). Associate Professors Wood and Brewer were supported by Clinical Career Development Awards from the NHMRC, and A/Prof. Brewer was additionally supported by the Colonial Foundation. Professor Yung is a NHMRC Research Fellow. Dr. Nelson was supported by the R.P. Griffith Fellowship at the University of Melbourne and a NARSAD Young Investigators Award. Portions of this study were also funded in part by the National Institutes of Health Grants MH-63381 to Dr. Moberg, MH-59852 to Dr. Turetsky, and 2R44 DC-007291 to Dr. G. Smutzer.