Journal article

Alpha 1-antitrypsin reduces inflammation and enhances mouse pancreatic islet transplant survival

Maria Koulmanda, Manoj Bhasin, Zhigang Fan, Dusan Hanidziar, Nipun Goel, Prabhakar Putheti, Babak Movahedi, Towia A Libermann, Terry B Strom

PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA | NATL ACAD SCIENCES | Published : 2012

Abstract

The promise of islet cell transplantation cannot be fully realized in the absence of improvements in engraftment of resilient islets. The marginal mass of islets surviving the serial peritransplant insults may lead to exhaustion and thereby contribute to an unacceptably high rate of intermediate and long-term graft loss. Hence, we have studied the effects of treatment with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) in a syngeneic nonautoimmune islet graft model. A marginal number of syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted into nonautoimmune diabetic hosts and islet function was analyzed in control and AAT treated hosts. In untreated controls, marginal mass islet transplants did not restore euglycemia. Outco..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health (NIH)


Awarded by Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF)


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Vaja Tchipashivili (Joslin Diabetes Center) for the islet isolation and Eva Czismada for her expert pathologic studies. This work was funded in part by the Segal Family Foundation (T.B.S.), National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grants 5 R01 AI50987 and NIH 1-U19 DK080652, and Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF) Grant 7-2005-1329 (to T.B.S., M.K., B.M., and T.A.L.). B.M. is funded by a JDRF postdoctoral fellowship grant.