Journal article

Intense physical activity is associated with cognitive performance in the elderly

BM Brown, JJ Peiffer, HR Sohrabi, A Mondal, VB Gupta, SR Rainey-Smith, K Taddei, S Burnham, KA Ellis, C Szoeke, CL Masters, D Ames, CC Rowe, RN Martins

TRANSLATIONAL PSYCHIATRY | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2012

Abstract

Numerous studies have reported positive impacts of physical activity on cognitive function. However, the majority of these studies have utilised physical activity questionnaires or surveys, thus results may have been influenced by reporting biases. Through the objective measurement of routine levels of physical activity via actigraphy, we report a significant association between intensity, but not volume, of physical activity and cognitive functioning. A cohort of 217 participants (aged 60-89 years) wore an actigraphy unit for 7 consecutive days and underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. The cohort was stratified into tertiles based on physical activity intensity. Compared wi..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

BB is supported by a University Postgraduate Award from the University of Western Australia and a Freemasons' Western Australia Student Award. Core funding for this study was provided by CSIRO, which was supplemented by 'in kind' contributions from study partners. This research is supported by the Science and Industry Endowment Fund. The AIBL investigators thank Richard Head of CSIRO for initiating and facilitating the AIBL collaboration (http://www.aibl.csiro.au/). The study also received support from the National Health and Medical Research Council via the Dementia Collaborative Research Centres programme. Pfizer International has contributed financial support to assist with analysis of blood samples and to further the AIBL research programme. The McCusker Alzheimer's Research Foundation contributed financial and 'in kind' support to AIBL. We thank all those who took part as subjects in the study for their commitment and dedication to helping advance research into the early detection and causation of Alzheimer's disease.