Journal article

The GCTM-5 Epitope Associated with the Mucin-Like Glycoprotein FCGBP Marks Progenitor Cells in Tissues of Endodermal Origin

Lincon A Stamp, David R Braxton, Jun Wu, Veronika Akopian, Kouichi Hasegawa, Parakrama T Chandrasoma, Susan M Hawes, Catriona McLean, Lydia M Petrovic, Kasper Wang, Martin F Pera

STEM CELLS | WILEY-BLACKWELL | Published : 2012

Abstract

Monoclonal antibodies against cell surface markers are powerful tools in the study of tissue regeneration, repair, and neoplasia, but there is a paucity of specific reagents to identify stem and progenitor cells in tissues of endodermal origin. The epitope defined by the GCTM-5 monoclonal antibody is a putative marker of hepatic progenitors. We sought to analyze further the distribution of the GCTM-5 antigen in normal tissues and disease states and to characterize the antigen biochemically. The GCTM-5 epitope was specifically expressed on tissues derived from the definitive endoderm, in particular the fetal gut, liver, and pancreas. Antibody reactivity was detected in subpopulations of norma..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health (pilot feasibility project of the USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, NIH)


Awarded by California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CHLA Stem Cell Training Grant)


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM


Funding Acknowledgements

Richard Boyd and Natalie Seach at Monash University assisted with staining of the thymic tissue. Tracy Zinberg assisted with in the initial stages of the characterization of the GCTM-5 antigen. Dilani Rosa of the Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at USC provided help with histology and slide preparations. This study was supported by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Australian Stem Cell Centre, The National Institutes of Health (pilot feasibility project of the USC Research Center for Liver Diseases, NIH Grant No. P30 DK04852), and the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CHLA Stem Cell Training Grant #: CIRM TG2-01168). The Deans of the Keck School of Medicine supported the research of D.R.B.