Journal article

Characterization of In Vivo Dlg1 Deletion on T Cell Development and Function

Lisa A Humphries, Meredith H Shaffer, Faruk Sacirbegovic, Tamar Tomassian, Kerrie-Ann McMahon, Patrick O Humbert, Oscar Silva, June L Round, Kogo Takamiya, Richard L Huganir, Janis K Burkhardt, Sarah M Russell, M Carrie Miceli

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2012

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The polarized reorganization of the T cell membrane and intracellular signaling molecules in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement has been implicated in the modulation of T cell development and effector responses. In siRNA-based studies Dlg1, a MAGUK scaffold protein and member of the Scribble polarity complex, has been shown to play a role in T cell polarity and TCR signal specificity, however the role of Dlg1 in T cell development and function in vivo remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the combined data from three independently-derived dlg1-knockout mouse models; two germline deficient knockouts and one conditional knockout. While defects w..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles)


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research


Funding Acknowledgements

Work by J.K.B. was supported by National Institutes of Health (http://www.nih.gov) grant P01 CA093615 and work by M.H.S. was supported by National Institutes of Health training grant T32-HD07516. Work by M.C.M. was supported by National Institutes of Health grant R01-AI067253-10 and by a UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) dissertation year fellowship to J.L.R., a UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) Microbial Pathogenesis Training Grant 2-T32-AI-07323 to T.T. and an Arthritis Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship to L.A.H. Work by S.M.R. and P.O.H. was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Research Council. The funders had no role in study design, data collection, and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.