Journal article

Recognition of microbial and mammalian phospholipid antigens by NKT cells with diverse TCRs

Raju VV Tatituri, Gerald FM Watts, Veemal Bhowruth, Nathaniel Barton, Alissa Rothchild, Fong-Fu Hsu, Catarina F Almeida, Liam R Cox, Lothar Eggeling, Susanna Cardell, Jamie Rossjohn, Dale I Godfrey, Samuel M Behar, Gurdyal S Besra, Michael B Brenner, Manfred Brigl

PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA | NATL ACAD SCIENCES | Published : 2013

Abstract

CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells include two major subgroups. The most widely studied are Vα14Jα18(+) invariant NKT (iNKT) cells that recognize the prototypical α-galactosylceramide antigen, whereas the other major group uses diverse T-cell receptor (TCR) α-and β-chains, does not recognize α-galactosylceramide, and is referred to as diverse NKT (dNKT) cells. dNKT cells play important roles during infection and autoimmunity, but the antigens they recognize remain poorly understood. Here, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG, or cardiolipin), and phosphatidylinositol from Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Corynebacterium glutamicum as microbial antigens ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants AI077795 (to M.B.), AI028973 and AI063428 (to M.B.B.), and RR000954, DK034388, DK020579 (Mass Spectrometry Center, Washington University); and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (D.I.G., C.F.A., and J.R.). C.F.A. is supported by a PhD scholarship from Fundacao para a Ciencia e Tecnologia Portugal; D.I.G. is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Senior Principal Research Fellowship, and J.R. is supported by an NHMRC Australia Fellowship. G.S.B. is supported by a Personal Research Chair from Mr. James Bardrick, The Wellcome Trust (084923/B/08/Z), and the Medical Research Council. NMR spectrometers used in this research were funded in part through Birmingham Science City: Innovative Uses for Advanced Materials in the Modern World (West Midlands Centre for Advanced Materials Project 2), with support from Advantage West Midlands and the European Regional Development Fund.