Journal article

Recycling factors for ribosome disassembly in the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium falciparum

Ankit Gupta, Snober S Mir, Katherine E Jackson, Erin E Lim, Priyanka Shah, Ashima Sinha, Mohammad Imran Siddiqi, Stuart A Ralph, Saman Habib

MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2013

Abstract

The reduced genomes of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are actively translated and antibiotic-mediated translation inhibition is detrimental to parasite survival. In order to understand recycling of organellar ribosomes, a critical step in protein translation, we identified ribosome recycling factors (RRF) encoded by the parasite nuclear genome. Targeting of PfRRF1 and PfRRF2 to the apicoplast and mitochondrion respectively was established by localization of leader sequence-GFP fusions. Unlike any RRF characterized thus far, PfRRF2 formed dimers with disulphide interaction(s) and additionally localized in the cytoplasm, thus suggesting adjunct f..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by European Community


Awarded by Indo-Spain Joint Cooperation grant from the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Prof. Umesh Varshney for E. coli MRE600 and LJ14 (frr)<SUP>ts</SUP> strains, Prof. Alan Cowman for the pGlux.1 vector, Prof. G. I. McFadden for anti-ACP antibody and Prof. W.G.J. Hol for the RIG plasmid. Dr Kavita Singh is acknowledged for help with confocal microscopy. A. G. and P. S. received scholarships from the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Government of India. This work was supported by the European Community's Seven Framework Programme (MEPHTIS Project, FP 7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement number (HEALTH-F3-2009-223024) and an Indo-Spain Joint Cooperation grant from the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India (DST/INT/Spain/P-33/11) to S. H. S. A. R. was funded by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT0990350) and a National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia project grant (628704). This is CDRI communication number 8440.