Journal article

The phenotype of Floating-Harbor syndrome: clinical characterization of 52 individuals with mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP

Sarah M Nikkel, Andrew Dauber, Sonja de Munnik, Meghan Connolly, Rebecca L Hood, Oana Caluseriu, Jane Hurst, Usha Kini, Malgorzata JM Nowaczyk, Alexandra Afenjar, Beate Albrecht, Judith E Allanson, Paolo Balestri, Tawfeg Ben-Omran, Francesco Brancati, Isabel Cordeiro, Bruna Santos da Cunha, Louisa A Delaney, Anne Destree, David Fitzpatrick Show all

ORPHANET JOURNAL OF RARE DISEASES | BMC | Published : 2013

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delays in expressive language, and a distinctive facial appearance. Recently, heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP were determined to be disease-causing. With the availability of a DNA based confirmatory test, we set forth to define the clinical features of this syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: Clinical information on fifty-two individuals with SRCAP mutations was collected using standardized questionnaires. Twenty-four males and twenty-eight females were studied with ages ranging from 2 to 52 years. The facial phenotype and expressive language impairments were defining features within the grou..

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Grants

Awarded by Ontario Genomics Institute


Awarded by NIH grant


Awarded by AnEUploidy project


Awarded by Italian Telethon


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the families for their cooperation and permission to publish these findings. SdM would like to thank Barto Otten. Funding was provided by the Government of Canada through Genome Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Ontario Genomics Institute (OGI-049), by Genome Quebec and Genome British Columbia, and the Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Children's Hospital Boston. KMB is supported by a Clinical Investigatorship Award from the CIHR Institute of Genetics. AD is supported by NIH grant K23HD073351. BBAdV and HGB were financially supported by the AnEUploidy project (LSHG-CT-2006-37627). This work was selected for study by the FORGE Canada Steering Committee, which consists of K. Boycott (University of Ottawa), J. Friedman (University of British Columbia), J. Michaud (University of Montreal), F. Bernier (University of Calgary), M. Brudno (University of Toronto), B. Fernandez (Memorial University), B. Knoppers (McGill University), M. Samuels (Universite de Montreal), and S. Scherer (University of Toronto). We thank the Galliera Genetic Bank - "Telethon Genetic Biobank Network" supported by Italian Telethon grants (project no. GTB07001) for providing us with specimens.