Journal article

Composition of the soil seed bank in remnant patches of grassy woodland along an urbanization gradient in Melbourne, Australia

Amy K Hahs, Mark J McDonnell

PLANT ECOLOGY | SPRINGER | Published : 2013

Abstract

Urban areas around the world are rapidly expanding, with flow-on consequences for the native plants and animals that inhabit these areas. The impacts of this urban growth are not always immediate, and in the case of the local extinction of plant species may take up to 100–150� years. Understanding how urbanization affects ecological patterns and processes may allow us to minimize the loss of species from these areas through better planning and conservation decisions. This study examined the composition of the soil seed bank in remnant patches of grassy woodland along an urbanization gradient in northern Melbourne, Australia, using an ex-situ glasshouse germination trial. A total of 108 speci..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

AKH was a recipient of an Australian Post-graduate Award (with stipend) whilst conducting this research. The Baker Foundation, the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne and the School of Botany at The University of Melbourne provided additional funding and support. Mick McCarthy helped with the Bayesian statistics, and Margaret Carreiro and Richard Hobbs provided helpful comments on a previous version of this research. Steve Elefteriadis, Terry Coates, and Ron Teo provided technical support. This manuscript was improved by comments from two anonymous reviewers.