Journal article

A type III effector antagonizes death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

Jaclyn S Pearson, Cristina Giogha, Sze Ying Ong, Catherine L Kennedy, Michelle Kelly, Keith S Robinson, Tania Wong Fok Lung, Ashley Mansell, Patrice Riedmaier, Clare VL Oates, Ali Zaid, Sabrina Muehlen, Valerie F Crepin, Olivier Marches, Ching-Seng Ang, Nicholas A Williamson, Lorraine A O'Reilly, Aleksandra Bankovacki, Ueli Nachbur, Giuseppe Infusini Show all

NATURE | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2013

Abstract

Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonize the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic (EPEC and EHEC, respectively) Escherichia coli use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonization and interfere with antimicrobial host responses. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death-domain-containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Lymphoma Society (New York; SCOR grant)


Funding Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge P. Bouillet for the gift of Bid<SUP>-/-</SUP> mice and T. Cumming for assistance with animal work. This work was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (Program Grant no. 606788 to E. L. H., Project Grants no. 637332, no. 1009145 to A. S., no. 1009145 to L.O.R., Australia Fellowship to A. S.), the Wellcome Trust to G. F., the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation; the Leukaemia and the Lymphoma Society (New York; SCOR grant no. 7413) to A. S. E. L. H was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship. J.S.P., M. K., T. W., C. G. and P. R. were supported by Australian Postgraduate Awards. This work was made possible through Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support and Australian Government NHMRC IRIISS.