Journal article

Driving Down Daily Step Counts: The Impact of Being Driven to School on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior

Georgina Trapp, Billie Giles-Corti, Hayley Christian, Anna Timperio, Gavin McCormack, Max Bulsara, Karen Villanueva

PEDIATRIC EXERCISE SCIENCE | HUMAN KINETICS PUBL INC | Published : 2013

Abstract

This study investigated whether being driven to school was associated with lower weekday and weekend step counts, less active out-of-school leisure pursuits, and more sedentary behavior. Boys aged 10-13 years (n = 384) and girls aged 9-13 years (n = 500) attending 25 Australian primary schools wore a pedometer and completed a travel diary for one week. Parents and children completed surveys capturing leisure activity, screen time, and sociodemographics. Commute distance was objectively measured. Car travel was the most frequent mode of school transportation (boys: 51%, girls: 58%). After adjustment (sociodemographics, commute distance, and school clustering) children who were driven recorded..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NHMRC Capacity Building Grant


Awarded by NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award


Awarded by NHMRC/National Heart Foundation Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by VicHealth Public Health Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the schools, children, and parents for their participation in the TREK study, along with everyone who helped with the data collection effort. Funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council is gratefully acknowledged (#403933). Trapp is supported by scholarships provided by an Australian postgraduate award and an NHMRC Capacity Building Grant (#458668); Giles-Corti is supported by an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award (#1004900); Christian is supported by a NHMRC/National Heart Foundation Early Career Fellowship (#1036350); Timperio by a VicHealth Public Health Research Fellowship (2004 0536); McCormack by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Bisby Postdoctoral Fellowship Award; and Villanueva by an Australian Postgraduate Award.