Journal article

Socio-ecological predictors of the uptake of cycling for recreation and transport in adults: Results from the RESIDE study

Hannah Badland, Matthew Knuiman, Paula Hooper, Billie Giles-Corti

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE | ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE | Published : 2013

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the uptake of cycling for recreation and transport, and relate these behaviors to individual, social, and environmental exposures over time. METHOD: Data were drawn from 909 adults in Time 2 (T2) (2005-2006) and Time 3 (T3) (2007-2008) of the RESIDE study (Australia). Demographics, perceptions of self-efficacy and social support related to cycling, neighborhood environment perceptions, and objective measures of the neighborhood were measured at T2. These were compared with uptake of cycling for recreation and transport at T3. RESULTS: At T3, 54 (5.9%) had taken up cycling for recreation and 44 (4.8%) for transport. Positive perceptions of self-efficacy at T2 were consis..

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Grants

Awarded by Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway)


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Capacity Building Grant


Awarded by NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award


Awarded by NHMRC Capacity Building Grant


Funding Acknowledgements

All funding bodies are gratefully acknowledged. RESIDE was funded by grants from the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway) (#11828), the Australian Research Council (ARC) (#LP0455453) and an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Capacity Building Grant (#458688). At the time of writing BGC was supported by an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow Award (#1004900) and PH by a Scholarship for International Research Fees (University of Western Australia) and NHMRC Capacity Building Grant (#458688).