Journal article

Childhood lifestyle and clinical determinants of adult ideal cardiovascular health. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study, the Princeton Follow-up Study

Tomi T Laitinen, Katja Pahkala, Alison Venn, Jessica G Woo, Mervi Oikonen, Terence Dwyer, Vera Mikkila, Nina Hutri-Kahonen, Kylie J Smith, Seana L Gall, John A Morrison, Jorma SA Viikari, Olli T Raitakari, Costan G Magnussen, Markus Juonala

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2013

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The American Heart Association recently defined ideal cardiovascular health by simultaneous presence of seven health behaviors and factors. The concept is associated with cardiovascular disease incidence, and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. To effectively promote ideal cardiovascular health already early in life, childhood factors predicting future ideal cardiovascular health should be investigated. Our aim was thus to comprehensively explore childhood determinants of adult ideal cardiovascular health in population based cohorts from three continents. METHODS: The sample comprised a total of 4409 participants aged 3-19 years at baseline from the Cardiovascular Ris..

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Grants

Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by DIVISION OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL APPLICATIONS


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

The YFS has been financially supported by the Academy of Finland (126925, 121584, 124282, 129378, 117797, and 41071), the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, Kuopio, Tampere, and Turku University Hospital Medical Funds, Juho Vainio Foundation, Paavo Nurmi Foundation, Finnish Foundation of Cardiovascular Research and Finnish Cultural Foundation, Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Orion-Farmos Research Foundation, Tampere Tuberculosis Foundation, and Emil Aaltonen Foundation. The CDAH study was funded by grants fromthe Australian National Health andMedical Research Council, the Australian National Heart Foundation, the Tasmanian Community Fund and Veolia Environmental Services. We gratefully thank the CDAH study sponsors (Sanitarium Health Food Company, ASICS Oceania and Target Australia). A. V receives a National Health and Medical Research Council Career Development Fellowship (APP 1008299). C. G. M. receives a National Health andMedical Research Council Early Career Fellowship (APP 1037559). The PFS was supported by the American Heart Association (National) 9750129N; National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) contract N01-2-HV-2914L; and NIH/ NHLBI grants HL62394, HL55025, and HL48941.