Journal article

Alterations in the optic radiations of very preterm children-Perinatal predictors and relationships with visual outcomes

Deanne K Thompson, Dolly Thai, Claire E Kelly, Alexander Leemans, Jacques-Donald Tournier, Michael J Kean, Katherine J Lee, Terrie E Inder, Lex W Doyle, Peter J Anderson, Rodney W Hunt

NEUROIMAGE-CLINICAL | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2014

Abstract

Children born very preterm (VPT) are at risk for visual impairments, the main risk factors being retinopathy of prematurity and cerebral white matter injury, however these only partially account for visual impairments in VPT children. This study aimed to compare optic radiation microstructure and volume between VPT and term-born children, and to investigate associations between 1) perinatal variables and optic radiations; 2) optic radiations and visual function in VPT children. We hypothesized that optic radiation microstructure would be altered in VPT children, predicted by neonatal cerebral white matter abnormality and retinopathy of prematurity, and associated with visual impairments. 142..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Health (NIH)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (Senior Research Fellowship)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (Early Career Fellowship)


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH &HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR ADVANCING TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge the help of the VIBeS and Developmental Imaging groups at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, as well as the WUNDER group in the School of Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. Thanks especially to Merilyn Bear for recruiting the children, as well as the children and families who participated in this study. This study was supported by the National Institute of Health (NIH) (R01 HD05709801, P30 HD062171, and UL1 TR000448 to T.E.I.), the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (Project Grant No. 237117 to T.E.I. and L.W.D.; Project Grant No. 491209 to P.J.A., T.E.I., L.W.D. and R.W.H.; Program Grant No. 628952 to J-D.T.; Senior Research Fellowship No. 628371 to P.J.A.; Early Career Fellowship No. 1012236 to D.K.T.), the Australian Research Council (Project Grant No. DP130103438 to J-D.T.), the United Cerebral Palsy Foundation, USA to T.E.I., and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program to P.J.A., J-D.T., and D.K.T.