Journal article

People living in hilly residential areas in metropolitan Perth have less diabetes: spurious association or important environmental determinant?

Karen Villanueva, Matthew Knuiman, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Sharyn Hickey, Sarah Foster, Hannah Badland, Andrea Nathan, Fiona Bull, Billie Giles-Corti

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH GEOGRAPHICS | BMC | Published : 2013

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Variations in 'slope' (how steep or flat the ground is) may be good for health. As walking up hills is a physiologically vigorous physical activity and can contribute to weight control, greater neighbourhood slopes may provide a protective barrier to weight gain, and help prevent Type 2 diabetes onset. We explored whether living in 'hilly' neighbourhoods was associated with diabetes prevalence among the Australian adult population. METHODS: Participants (≥25 years; n = 11,406) who completed the Western Australian Health and Wellbeing Surveillance System Survey (2003-2009) were asked whether or not they had medically-diagnosed diabetes. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) softwar..

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