Journal article

A Pooled Analysis of Waist Circumference and Mortality in 650,000 Adults

James R Cerhan, Steven C Moore, Eric J Jacobs, Cari M Kitahara, Philip S Rosenberg, Hans-Olov Adami, Jon O Ebbert, Dallas R English, Susan M Gapstur, Graham G Giles, Pamela L Horn-Ross, Yikyung Park, Alpa V Patel, Kim Robien, Elisabete Weiderpass, Walter C Willett, Alicja Wolk, Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Patricia Hartge, Leslie Bernstein Show all

MAYO CLINIC PROCEEDINGS | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2014

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess the independent effect of waist circumference on mortality across the entire body mass index (BMI) range and to estimate the loss in life expectancy related to a higher waist circumference. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We pooled data from 11 prospective cohort studies with 650,386 white adults aged 20 to 83 years and enrolled from January 1, 1986, through December 31, 2000. We used proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for the association of waist circumference with mortality. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 9 years (maximum, 21 years), 78,268 participants died. After accounting for age, study, BMI, smoking status, alcohol consumptio..

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Awarded by National Cancer Institute


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

The National Institutes of Healthe-AARP Diet and Health study was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. The Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project Follow-up Study has been supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. The California Teachers Study was supported by National Cancer Institute grant CA77398 and contract 97-10500 from the California Breast Cancer Research Fund. The Cancer Prevention Study II was supported by the American Cancer Society. The Cohort of Swedish Men was supported by the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, and the Swedish Cancer Society. The Health Professionals Follow-up Study is supported by National Cancer Institute grant P01 CA055075. The Iowa Women's Health Study is supported by the National Cancer Institute grant R01 CA39742. The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study receives core funding from The Cancer Council Victoria and is additionally supported by grants 209057, 251533, and 396414 from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. The New York University Women's Health Study is supported by National Cancer Institute grants R01 CA098661 and P30 CA016087 and by center grant ES000260 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Swedish Mammography Cohort was supported by the Swedish Research Council, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research, and the Swedish Cancer Society. The Women's Lifestyle and Health project was supported by the Swedish Cancer Society and the Swedish Research Council.