Journal article

Anxiety in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Emma Sciberras, Kate Lycett, Daryl Efron, Fiona Mensah, Bibi Gerner, Harriet Hiscock

PEDIATRICS | AMER ACAD PEDIATRICS | Published : 2014

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Although anxiety is common in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it is unclear how anxiety influences the lives of these children. This study examined the association between anxiety comorbidities and functioning by comparing children with ADHD and no, 1, or ≥2 anxiety comorbidities. Differential associations were examined by current ADHD presentation (subtype). METHODS: Children with diagnostically confirmed ADHD (N = 392; 5-13 years) were recruited via 21 pediatrician practices across Victoria, Australia. Anxiety was assessed by using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children-IV. Functional measures included parent-reported: quality of li..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHRMC)


Awarded by NHMRC Early Career Fellowships in Population Health


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Award


Funding Acknowledgements

All aspects of the randomized controlled trial, including follow-up, were funded by a Project Grant from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHRMC; grant 607362). All aspects of the cohort study involving children with no/mild sleep problems were funded by Centre for Community Child Health at the Royal Children's Hospital and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI). Dr Sciberras and Dr Mensah's positions are funded by NHMRC Early Career Fellowships in Population Health (grants 1037159 and 1037449). Associate Professor Hiscock's position is funded by an NHMRC Career Development Award (grant 607351). Ms Lycett is funded by the Hugh Rogers fund and an MCRI Postgraduate Health Scholarship. Dr Efron is funded by an MCRI Career Development Award. The MCRI is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program.