Journal article

Evaluation of PIK3CA Mutation As a Predictor of Benefit From Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

Enric Domingo, David N Church, Oliver Sieber, Rajarajan Ramamoorthy, Yoko Yanagisawa, Elaine Johnstone, Brian Davidson, David J Kerr, Ian PM Tomlinson, Rachel Midgley

Journal of Clinical Oncology | AMER SOC CLINICAL ONCOLOGY | Published : 2013

Abstract

PURPOSE: Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) protect against colorectal cancer (CRC) and are associated with reduced disease recurrence and improved outcome after primary treatment. However, toxicities of NSAIDs have limited their use as antineoplastic therapy. Recent data have suggested that the benefit of aspirin after CRC diagnosis is limited to patients with PIK3CA-mutant cancers. We sought to determine the predictive utility of PIK3CA mutation for benefit from both cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and aspirin. METHODS: We performed molecular analysis of tumors from 896 participants in the Vioxx in Colorectal Cancer Therapy: Definition of Optimal Regime (VICTOR) tr..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Cancer Research UK


Awarded by European Union


Awarded by Systems Biology of Colorectal Cancer collaborative project


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by National Institute for Health Research


Funding Acknowledgements

The Vioxx in Colorectal Cancer Therapy: Definition of Optimal Regime (VICTOR) trial was supported by the University of Oxford and an educational study grant from Merck (Whitehouse Station, NJ). Molecular analyses were funded by grants from Cancer Research UK (Grant No. C6199/A10417), the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (Grant No. FP7/207-2013), Systems Biology of Colorectal Cancer collaborative project (Grant No. 258236), and the Oxford National Institute for Health Research Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre. The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics receives core funding from the Wellcome Trust (090532/Z/09/Z). D.N.C. has received funding from the Oxford Cancer Research Centre.