Journal article

Impact of adiposity on cardiac structure in adult life: the childhood determinants of adult health (CDAH) study

Robyn J Tapp, Alison Venn, Quan L Huynh, Olli T Raitakari, Obioha C Ukoumunne, Terence Dwyer, Costan G Magnussen

BMC Cardiovascular Disorders | BIOMED CENTRAL LTD | Published : 2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND: We have examined the association between adiposity and cardiac structure in adulthood, using a life course approach that takes account of the contribution of adiposity in both childhood and adulthood. METHODS: The Childhood Determinants of Adult Health study (CDAH) is a follow-up study of 8,498 children who participated in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey (ASHFS). The CDAH follow-up study included 2,410 participants who attended a clinic examination. Of these, 181 underwent cardiac imaging and provided complete data. The measures were taken once when the children were aged 9 to 15 years, and once in adult life, aged 26 to 36 years. RESULTS: There was a positi..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Public Health Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey was supported by the Commonwealth Departments of Sport, Recreation and Tourism, and Health; The National Heart Foundation; and the Commonwealth Schools Commission. The Childhood Determinants of Adult Health study, was supported by: the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian National Heart Foundation, the Tasmanian Community Fund, and Veolia Environmental Services. Financial support was also provided by: Sanitarium Health Food Company, ASICS Oceania, and Target Australia. C. G. M. is supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Public Health Fellowship (Grant No. 1037559). OU is supported by the Peninsula Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC), a collaboration between the University of Exeter, University of Plymouth, and National Health Service South West, funded by the National Institute for Health Research. No funding organization had any role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation of the manuscript.