Journal article

Evolving role of tumor antigens for future melanoma therapies

Miles C Andrews, Katherine Woods, Jonathan Cebon, Andreas Behren

Future Oncology | FUTURE MEDICINE LTD | Published : 2014

Abstract

Human tumor rejection antigens recognized by T lymphocytes were first defined in the early 1990s and the identification of shared tumor-restricted antigens sparked hopes for the development of a therapeutic vaccination to treat cancer, including melanoma. Despite decades of intense preclinical and clinical research, the success of anticancer vaccines based on these antigens has been limited. While melanoma is a highly immunogenic tumor, the ability to prime immunity with vaccines has not generally translated into objective disease regression. However, with the development of small molecules targeting oncogenic proteins, such as V600-mutated BRAF, and immune checkpoint inhibitors with demonst..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Medical and Dental Postgraduate Research Scholarship


Funding Acknowledgements

The Cancer Immunobiology Laboratory and Jonathan Cebon are supported in part by grants from the Melanoma Research Agency (MRA) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). Andreas Behren is supported by a Cure Cancer Australia Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowhip. Miles C Andrews is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Medical and Dental Postgraduate Research Scholarship (#1055456). The authors have no other relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript apart from those disclosed.