Journal article

Toward Understanding the Functional Role of Ss-riok-1, a RIO Protein Kinase-Encoding Gene of Strongyloides stercoralis

Wang Yuan, James B Lok, Jonathan D Stoltzfus, Robin B Gasser, Fang Fang, Wei-Qiang Lei, Rui Fang, Yan-Qin Zhou, Jun-Long Zhao, Min Hu

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Some studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals have shown that RIO protein kinases (RIOKs) are involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle progression and development. However, there is a paucity of information on their functions in parasitic nematodes. We aimed to investigate the function of RIOK-1 encoding gene from Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasitizing humans and dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The RIOK-1 protein-encoding gene Ss-riok-1 was characterized from S. stercoralis. The full-length cDNA, gDNA and putative promoter region of Ss-riok-1 were isolated and sequenced. The cDNA comprises 1,828 bp, including a 377 bp 5'-UTR, a 17 bp 3'-UTR and a 1,434..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities


Awarded by Special Fund for Agro-scientific Research in the Public Interest


Awarded by National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA


Awarded by Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI) on its Peak Computing Facility at the University of Melbourne, an initiative of the Victorian Government


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by "Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities" (Program no. 2011PY118) and "Special Fund for Agro-scientific Research in the Public Interest" (Grant No. 201303037) to MH and by a grant from The National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA (AI-50688) to JBL. Funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia, the Australian Research Council (ARC) and Melbourne Water Corporation is gratefully acknowledged (RBG). This study was also supported by a Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI) grant number VR0007 on its Peak Computing Facility at the University of Melbourne, an initiative of the Victorian Government (RBG). Other support from the Australian Academy of Science and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation is gratefully acknowledged (RBG). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.