Journal article

Quantifying impacts of climate variability and human activities on the hydrological system of the Haihe River Basin, China

S Lu, B Wu, Y Wei, N Yan, H Wang, S Guo

Environmental Earth Sciences | Springer Berlin Heidelberg | Published : 2015

Abstract

In the last 50 years, the hydrological system of the Haihe River Basin in northern China has undergone great changes, such as declines in runoff and discharge, rivers drying up, and groundwater depletion. Both climate variability and human activities have been regarded as causes for these changes, but which is the major reason was not clear in the past. This paper aims to quantify the impact of climate variability, particularly changes of precipitation, and human activities (water storage projects, agricultural development, soil and water conservation projects, and agricultural water saving) on the hydrological system of the basin. A basin-level water consumption balance model was used to si..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Chinese Academy of Sciences


Awarded by Ministry of Water Resource


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Commonwealth of Australia under Australia-China Science and Research Fund


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Key Innovation Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KZCX1-YW-08-03), the Non-profit Research Program of the Ministry of Water Resource (No. 201101015), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41101401), and the Commonwealth of Australia under the Australia-China Science and Research Fund (Project No: ACS-RF800). We are profoundly grateful to Professor Ian Willett from the University of Melbourne and Dr. Muhammad Hasan Ali Baig from the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, for carefully reviewing the manuscript and providing valuable advice. We also thank the Haihe River Water Conservancy Committee, the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System (www.cdc.cma.gov.cn) and the China Earth System Science Data Sharing Project (www.geodata.cn) for hydrological, demographic and economic, and climate data.